The Bad Seed vs. The Bad Seed

The Bad Seed vs. The Bad Seed

Ainsley Maddalena, Reporter

The Bad Seed (1956) vs The Bad Seed (2018)

Released in September 1954 by American author and U.S. Marine William March, The Bad Seed quickly gained popularity and became a Broadway play, written by Maxwell Anderson, by December of 1954. On September 12, 1956 the infamous novel and play became a movie that was viewed by Americans all across the country. The movie starred the Broadway cast and was written by March and Andreson. In 1985, the second movie remake was made but, to my knowledge, didn’t gain nearly as much tracktion; remakes rarely do. However, in today’s society remakes are being done left and right, as is the resurrection of many TV shows. This made me think: could a remake actually be better than the original?

 

The Bad Seed (1956):

Sticking with the original cast of characters is always a good idea when adapting a film from a novel. The main characters are: The mother, Christine Penmark (Nancy Kelly); the insane child, Rhoda Penmark (Patty McCormack); the sketchy maintenance man, Leroy Jessup (Henry Jones); a grieving mother, Hortense Daigle (Eileen Heckart); the loving neighbor, Monica Breedlove (Evelyn Varden). The main plot line is as follows: At a school picnic, a boy named Claude Daigle drowns. He also happens to be the winner of the penmanship medal, which Rhoda was hoping to win. As the story goes on, Christine begins to question her own childhood.

 

The Bad Seed (2018):

In the Rob Lowe directed remake, the cast changes entirely. The main characters are: The insane child, Emma Grossman (McKenna Grace); the father, David Grossman (Rob Lowe); the new nanny, Chloe (Sarah Dugdale); the psychiatrist, Dr. March (Patty McCormack); the caretaker, Brian (Lorne Cardinal); David’s sister and Emma’s aunt, Angela Grossman (Cara Buono). The main plot line is as follows: At a school award ceremony, a boy named Milo drowns. He also happens to be the winner of the citizenship metal, which Emma was hoping to win. As the story goes on, David begins to re-cultivate his wife’s death during Emma’s birth.

 

So what do you watch? Truthfully, their both wonderful films. The 1956 version was ahead of his time and, in using the actors from Broadway, shows phenomenal acting, directing, writing, and production.Yes, it is still a little cheesy at times but most movies from the 1900s are so; what are you going to do? The 2018 version also has phenomenal acting, writing, and production. Lowe, making his directorial debut, did a good job. Nothing was choppy or cheesy, just… Rob Lowe. I don’t mean that in a bad way but in the way that you can definitely tell when Lowe was involved. In conclusion, if you’re into black and white films with an old, Hollywood-glamour type vibe then I would highly recommend the 1956 version. If you’re into remakes and Hollywood’s current mood then I would highly recommend the 2018 version. Either one you choose, or if you choose both, are sure to please any movie-goer.