Teens and Technology

Anna Tabet - Reporter

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With recent raved about advancements in technology, it isn’t surprising to assume that these changes will penetrate the seemingly concrete walls of our schools. However, while some teachers and administrators welcome the changes and adhere to the quick and at times severe shifts that accompany the ever bolstering world of technology, others go to great lengths to ensure they do not become a part of their classes’ everyday routine.

When comparing the words technology and Lake Travis High School, the common denominator quite frequently is Schoology. As of two years ago, Lake Travis High School became completely dependent on the platform for getting word out to students for all school and class related issues and activities. If a student lost an assignment or needed to know if they had a test the following day, they checked Schoology. Nonetheless, some teachers utilized the website to teach and at times test certain parts of their lessons, while others would rarely update the student’s daily agenda. This severe divide leaves many students frustrated and lost for they are not able to attain the information they need, and with each teacher formatting their pages differently, they frequently don’t know where to look.

High School students have been conditioned to taking tests on paper since the age of 7. With the new age of technology and recent pushes towards online quizzes and tests, students feel pressured and uncomfortable with the seemingly abrupt shift. The concept of being able to write notes near our questions or to eliminate answer choices, or even the simple action of holding our test in our hands was gone. The ease it brings teachers in regards to the grading process is understood, however the seemingly miniscule scribbles that assist students in thinking through the complexity of a problem are imperative to the success of specified students in a course.

I truly believe I have witnessed and taken part in a debate about cell phones, to some degree, in nearly every single one of my classes. It seems everyone has an opinion on cell phones and their impact on the lives of tenagers, and more specifically, students. A large section of teachers view cell phones as a distraction and have some sort of system that separates students from their devices. The question that arises is how truly effective these methods are. If a student is truly devoted to using their cellphone at some point during the hour and half class sessions, then it is more likely than not that they will find a way to use it. Should teachers who implement these methods then just give up? I don’t believe so, no. These approaches to the issue of cell phones act as a sort of break between the constant cycle of checking phones for notifications, no matter how effective, this response does severely decrease.

Technology is going to continue developing and advancing despite certain people’s desires. A majority of students and teachers have accepted this fate with complete ease and admiration. It would be even more helpful for students if there was some sort of fluidity among the various platforms of technology used within classrooms, for now it is interesting and insightful however at times overwhelming and plainly confusing.

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